"Scientists are alarmed …" 

When you dump i don’t even know how many ungodly gallons of oil and crap into the ocean and fish start coming out screwed up is “alarmed” really the word to go with?

I feel as if I could have told you the fish were going to come out a little screwy at least for while, hopefully the chemicals don’t produce heritable mutation and things are able to return to the way they were eventually.

Or these are heritable mutations and the fish are going to adapt more quickly - if that’s the case maybe we should be dumping oil everywhere in hopes that rapid mutations will offset the effects of rapid climate change and changes in the chemical and temperature compositions of the ocean and currents .  ..  something tells me that wouldn’t work so well though lol. (lots of sarcasm in that last statement, I’m not actually an idiot) (stay with me here XD ).

Hey there world, please take the time to answer these questions for me! I would really help me out with a class project I’m working on.

1. What age group do you belong to? (10-16, 17-21, 22-30, 30-40, 40+)

2. What environmental issues do you find most pressing/concerning?

3. What are some of your favorite science/environmental blogs? if you know of any.

4. How often would you say you read primary literature: Almost Daily, Weekly, Bi-weekly, Monthly, or Almost never.

5. Do you have a degree - or hope to pursue a degree? What field of study?

6. Do you feel your decisions/voice matters? Do your actions make a difference?

Please reply, or send me a message whichever you’d prefer, and PLEASE REBLOG!

THANKS!!!!!

SURVEY!: Please Help! For Project! Due Soon!

Hey so please take some time to fill out this survey, I think it’s silly but I have to do it for a writing class to assess my audience. So here we go:

1. What age group do you belong to? (10-16, 17-21, 22-30, 30-40, 40+)

2. What environmental issues do you find most pressing/concerning?

3. What are some of your favorite science/environmental blogs? if you know of any.

4. How often would you say you read primary literature: Almost Daily, Weekly, Bi-weekly, Monthly, or Almost never.

5. Do you have a degree - or hope to pursue a degree? What field of study?

6. Do you feel your decisions/voice matters? Do your actions make a difference?

Please reply, or send me a message whichever you’d prefer, and PLEASE REBLOG!

THANKS!!!!!

Hey so please take some time to fill out this survey, I think it’s silly but I have to do it for a writing class to assess my audience. So here we go:

1. What age group do you belong to? (10-16, 17-21, 22-30, 30-40, 40+)

2. What environmental issues do you find most pressing/concerning?

3. What are some of your favorite science/environmental blogs? if you know of any.

4. How often would you say you read primary literature: Almost Daily, Weekly, Bi-weekly, Monthly, or Almost never.

5. Do you have a degree - or hope to pursue a degree? What field of study?

6. Do you feel your decisions/voice matters? Do your actions make a difference?

Please reply, or send me a message whichever you’d prefer, and PLEASE REBLOG!

THANKS!!!!!

Talking in class today we discussed the correlation between abundance of deer fawns and bear cubs and beech nut mast. It basically lead me to thinking, once again, about just how powerfully abundant the northeast was previous to european arrival.

Absolutely massive trees, closely related to the oak and beech were highly abundant producing incredible masts - I believe yearly - but however often they certainly provided an incredible resources for the pre-european forests.

Upon arrival europeans began eaking out a niche for themselves and destroying everything. First to go were apex predators, removal of wolves, native americans, and other high predators. Followed by the immediate squandering of prey species which were quite quickly pushed out of their natural ranges.

Through poison, over-hunting, and lumber trade the northeast has been raped of its resources in such a way that it will likely never return. Introduction of a non-natural pest has shown us the death of the American chestnut - good-bye chestnut mast.

Ecosystems and their efficiency rely upon the lower levels, and the lowest level would be the plant life. All of the energy that drives the systems of the earth come from the sun and the majority of ecosystem energy comes from the photosynthesizers that harvest this energy.

The loss of the chestnut has placed an unthinkable limitation to the northeastern american ecosystems. The carrying capacity of our system is now so much more drastically lower than it could have been previously.

Nowadays our models of wildlife management require our holding hands with nature and doctoring the wild to work efficiently. We observe, collect data, and conduct studies to find what we’re doing right, what we’re doing wrong. Without us the system would fall apart, take millions of years to repair itself, and then one day … maybe it would return to its former glory.

As our populations grow, and our economies fail, I have little doubt that our resources will run short … that conservation will fall to ending starvation, that our destruction will catch up with us. If we don’t work now to create a more sustainable future, we risk even more loss than we’ve already seen.

The loss of the chestnut was a tragedy, and unfortunately the story is not unique. Introduction of pest species from foreign sources due to trade is not uncommon, in a few short years my children will never have heard of hemlocks.

So often conservation is based by looking at animals, but what we need to realize is the importance of vegetation to the entirety of our system.